The Trossfrau sock

UPDATE: read about  my latest type of socks here

Several pictures shows the trossfrau wearing some sort of socks, and I’m currently working on figuring out the two different common styles

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Would be nice to wear during summer instead of full length hosen, or if I make it out of wool, a nice addition to colder nights.

Update; Since several people have asked about the pattern and how to make them, I’ll give you some instruction of how to get started!
I started the project with the hypophysis that the socks is made out of either cut off hosen or at least based on the same pattern. There is several different nice tutorial of how to make a pair of hosen out on the internet, but making a pair out of fabric requires some extra pair of hand, and you don’t always have a friend around to help you, so I suggest the Duct Tape Toille;

1) cover your foot with a sock (or fabric or a plastic wrap; it’s for not getting an unwanted hair wax from the duct tape)
2) tape your foot with Duct Tape, not to thick layer and be sure to not crimp your toes
3-5) draw the cutting lines; since I base mine on a pair of ordinary hosen, I have the mid back seam that goes underneath the heal, and then a foot piece with “wings”. This gives you a fitted hosen pattern.
6) cut the duct tape by the mid back seam so you can remove it from your foot, then cut the rest of the lines
7-8) your pieces should look something like this, if you can’t flatten the larger piece, then you need to adjust the “wings” a bit
9) transfer the pieces to a new paper and adjust and clean the lines
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When your base is finished, you can start remodeling the edge of the hose depending on which woodcut or painting you feel to duplicate;
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Update;
After working with the pattern for a couple of days, I’m satisfied with the result of sock A;

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The pattern ended up being cut into smaller pieces, which will make the assembly much easier.

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The finished pair of socks

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Update; the linen socks was great, but the wool ones are awesome! Soft, and incredible comfortable, just like the linen ones, these protects your shoes from filling up with a great deal of sand, stones etc, and provides a nice soft soles.

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I also found an interesting site with a different angle of how to recreate the footsies, read and broaden your view; raised heel shoe

Update;

A friend, Lady Petronilla of London managed to find some exclusive photos of an extant example of linen inner shoes from the 15th c, I now look forward to study them further and adjust my pattern to the new information given. She has also promised to see if she can get even better pictures of the different sides of the shoes, until then, here is what I have;

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7 comments on “The Trossfrau sock

  1. Ankharet verch Meredudd says:

    love this! i feel like an idiot. i avoid making hose and socks because i cannot stand the MATH in the pattern equasions i have been given. Ive done the duct take patterns before and it never occired to me to do so with my fee! wow, you are a genius! thank you!

  2. Christina says:

    Would you be willing to share the whole images you cite in this article about the short stockings/gaiters? One of my FB groups is discussing period gaiters. — Thanks!

    • The pictures is Amorous Peasants by Dürer, Landsknecht und sei Weib by Schön. The third picture is unknown for me as well, you can find that one, among others with the short sock, in my Pinterest (Whilja de Gothia) board “Shoes/Hosen”

  3. […] I made my first pair of socks (read more here), a friend posted pictures of a a pair of short linen socks found at Regensburg Historisches Museum […]

  4. The Oncoming Storm says:

    well, this may be a lot easier of a pattern than the others i’ve seen. the duct tape form is pretty brilliant too.

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